Sakichi Toyoda

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Sakichi Toyoda (February 14, 1867 – October 30, 1930) is referred to as the “King of Japanese Inventors”.  He started the Toyoda family companies, starting with an engineering manufacturing company called the Toyoda Automatic Loom Works in 1926. It earned him the moniker of father of the Japanese industrial revolution. His son, Kiichiro Toyoda, would later establish the world’s largest automaker, Toyota.

His most famous invention was the automatic power loom, in which he implemented the principle of Jidoka (autonomous automation) and error proofing.

He also developed the concept of 5 Why’s. When a problem occurs, ask “why” five times to try to find the source of the problem, then put into place something to prevent the problem from recurring. This concept is used today as part of applying lean methodologies to solve problems, improve quality, and reduce costs.

Sakichi Toyoda passed away in October 1930, having devoted his 63 years to invention. The top management of Toyoda companies assembled the “Toyoda Precepts” to clearly crystallize his spirit.

  • Always be faithful to your duties, thereby contributing to the Company and to the overall good.
  • Always be studious and creative, striving to stay ahead of the times.
  • Always be practical and avoid frivolousness.
  • Always strive to build a homelike atmosphere at work that is warm and friendly.
  • Always have respect for God and remember to be grateful at all times.

Influenced

  • Kiichiro Toyoda

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